New Guinea Singing Dog

//New Guinea Singing Dog

New Guinea Singing Dog

General Description

The New Guinea Singing Dog is a rare breed with many unique and distinctive characteristics. Covered in fluffy hair, their small round head stretches into their long rectangular muzzle. Dark brown almond-shaped eyes are slightly set back in their head. On top of their head are two uniquely shaped but small ears that stand erect. An extremely long and skinny neck leads to their long narrow body and sunken in stomach. Short muscular legs end with rounded feet. From their back is a long fluffy tail similar to a fox’s tail. A short length fluffy coat covers their body. Coat colors are most commonly shades of red with white markings but can also be black and tan or red without white.

character:

The New Guinea Singing Dog is not a completely domesticated dog, but they can easily be socialized to be a family dog. Wonderful with children and their family, this breed loves attention. However, they are wary of strangers sometimes and are frequently aggressive with other dogs even with socialization. Great for training because of their intelligent nature, they can become very focused and will not respond to you especially while hunting. A curious nature makes them get into things often. One thing some owners will not like is their frequent barking, however, it is very distinctive and often pretty sounding hence the breed’s name.
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This breed is best trained while is still very young. They tend to become more stubborn and independent as they age. More training patience is needed as the dog ages.

Size:

14 – 15 inches

Weight:

18 – 30 pounds

General Health:

The New Guinea Singing Dog is an extremely healthy breed with no genetic diseases. Plus this breed is a very long living dog with an average life expectancy of 15-20 years which is much longer than most dogs.

History:

As the name implies, the New Guinea Singing Dog originates on the island of New Guinea where it lived with the natives. By the time European explorers had contact with the people and the dogs of the area, the breed was already becoming a hybrid. A few pairs of pure New Guinea Singing Dogs have been captured over the last several decades and sent to zoos where they can be protected.

Maintenance:

Grooming the New Guinea Singing Dog is simple. Since they are a fairly wild breed, their coat takes care of itself. Exercise is a different story because this breed, of course, is very active. This breed should get vigorous exercise every day.

Ideal Environment:

The Guinea Singing Dog is a sweet dog but is almost extinct, so most families will not be able to get one. Plus, they are closely related to wild dogs and are being protected by many zoos. With good socialization, they can be a wonderful family dog but will still be aggressive with other dogs. They are not a good breed for many families or apartments. They do best in cold weather and with a yard.
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The New Guinea Singing Dog, also known as the New Guinea Dingo, is a wild dog that most believe still exists in the wild. They are isolated to the more remote mountain regions of New Guinea. They make excellent family companions, but require considerable exercise and recreation. They tend to roam off on their own when off lead so keeping them in an enclosure and on lead either by harness or collar is a must. Their song, which is a beautiful, high pitched, modulated howl can be very annoying to neighbors so choosing a smart place to live with a Singer is important. Singers are escape artists. A secure fencing at least 6 feet in height with dig barriers is recommended. Many owners even cover screen windows and doors in their homes to prevent escape.

Dog Training:

If you're having problems training your dog or getting control, you should read our review of DogProblems.com. Adam will do whatever it takes to help you whip your dog into shape. I've used them to help with my Great Dane as well as help friends train their dogs. It's the first place I go to help answer users Questions. Many training issues are too extensive to answer in this forum, which is why I refer a lot of the load to his site.

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2017-09-07T17:38:02+00:00